By | June 2, 2022
Each vs Every: Difference between Each and Every

Each vs Every: When it comes to talking about groups of things, we often use the words “each” and “every.” But do you know the difference between each and every? If not, don’t worry – this article will explain everything!

What is the difference between each and every?

The main difference between each and every is that each refers to one item in a group, whereas every refers to all items in a group. For example, if you have five apples and you want to divide them equally among three people, you would say “Each person gets two apples.” On the other hand, if you want to give all five apples to one person, you would say “I’m giving every apple to Sarah.”

When it comes to grammar, each and every are both determiners. This means that they can be used before a noun in order to specify which things we’re talking about. However, there are some subtle differences in how we use these words.

For instance, we tend to use each when we’re referring to individual items in a group, one at a time. Example, “Please take one cookie from the plate – make sure each person gets their own.” Alternatively, we use every when we’re referring to all items in a group simultaneously. For example, “We need to eat every cookie on the plate so that no-one goes hungry.”

It’s also worth noting that each is always followed by a singular noun, whereas every can be followed by

Each vs Every: When to use

There is often confusion over when to use “each” and when to use “every”. The main difference is that “each” is used for two or more items that are considered individually, whereas “every” is used for three or more items that are considered as a whole.

Here are some examples:

We bought two pizzas, one for each of us. (Each refers to the individual pizzas.)
We bought three pizzas, and every one of them was delicious. (Every refers to the pizzas as a group.)

When to use

Each and every are both pronouns and determiners. They are similar in meaning but each is used when we want to refer to two or more things individually, one by one. Every is used when we want to refer to a group of things as a whole.

Here are some examples:

Each of the students went to the library.

Every student in the class is required to read the book.

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Each vs Every: Examples of

When to Use Each

Each can be used when referring to a group of two or more people or things, where every would not be appropriate. For example, you might say “I invited each of my friends to my party” to mean that you invited all of your friends and didn’t leave anyone out.

You can also use each in situations where you need to single out one member of a group. For example, if you have three siblings and you want to talk about what each of them is doing, you would say “My brother is a doctor, my sister is a lawyer, and my other sister is an accountant.” In this case, using each makes it clear that you are talking about three different people.

When Not to Use Each

Every is generally the better choice when referring to a group of two or more people or things. For example, you would say “I go to the gym every day” rather than “I go to the gym each day.”

There are some exceptions to this rule, however. For example, you might say “Each of these cookies has nuts in it” to mean that every cookie contains nuts. In this case, using each emphasizes that there are multiple cookies involved

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Each vs Every: Conclusion

We hope that this article has helped clear up any confusion you may have had about the difference between each and every. As a general rule of thumb, you can use each when you are referring to two or more items individually, and every when you are referring to all of the items in a group collectively. Keep these tips in mind the next time you need to choose between each and every in your writing, and you’ll be sure to get it right.