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Exploring Impact Craters: Unveiling the Wonders of Craters

Scientists have confirmed around 190 meteor craters on Earth, causing the extinction of many species, including dinosaurs, and leaving a significant impact on the planet's surface.

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Exploring Impact Craters: Scientists have confirmed approximately 190 meteor craters on Earth. These meteors have not only left their mark on the surface of the planet, but also caused the extinction of many species, including dinosaurs.

Reports state that Earth has approximately 190 known meteor craters. Smaller objects impact the surface at high speed, forming circular depressions known as impact craters. Impact craters usually have raised floors and rims that are lower in elevation than the surrounding terrain. Due to the cataclysmic collisions of meteors with space objects, meteor impact craters have been formed on the surface of the planet since it was formed. As well as leaving marks on the surface of the Earth, meteor impacts have also resulted in the extinction of several species, most notably dinosaurs. In this article, we will examine some of the largest meteor impact craters in the world.

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Exploring Impact Craters

Vredefort

Vredefort in South Africa was the site where one of the largest asteroids to have ever hit the Earth. UNESCO designated Vredefort a World Heritage Site in 2005 due to its geological significance. This rare multiple-ringed impact structure on Earth has a diameter of 300 kilometers.

Vredefort
Source: IOL

Chicxulub

Located in Mexico, the Chicxulub crater was named after the onshore community of Chicxulub Pueblo. Based upon estimates, the crater has a diameter of 180 km and a depth of 20 km. Approximately 66 million years ago, a massive asteroid with a diameter of ten kilometers struck the planet, forming it. Many believe that the asteroid’s impact was so devastating that it wiped out 75% of plant and animal species, including all non-avian dinosaurs.

Chicxulub
Source: Science

Sudbury Basin

The Sudbury Basin, located in Canada, formed approximately 1.849 billion years ago as per estimates. It formed when an impactor body struck, creating a crater of approximately 10–15 km in size. In the present day, scientists believe that the impact crater is a smaller portion of a 130-kilometer circle. Sudbury Basin is approximately 62 km long, 30 km wide, and 15 km deep and serves as an important mining region.

Sudbury Basin
Source: Daily Mail

Popigai

In Russia’s northern Siberia, this impact crater is the result of an impact crater that occurred 35 million years ago and had a diameter of 100 kilometers. The site has found several diamonds, but they have not mined them due to the remote location and lack of infrastructure.

Popigai
Source: Neuva Propuesta

Manicouagan

A meteorite struck the area in Canada around 214 million years ago, forming this reservoir. Manicouagan Reservoir lies in an ancient crater created by an asteroid with a diameter of 5 km. Erosions and sediment have reduced the diameter of the crater to about 72 km.

Manicouagan
Source: Wikivoyage
Muskan Manocha
Muskan Manochahttps://www.eduvast.com
Muskan Manocha is pursuing graduation from University of Delhi.

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