Latest

Related Posts

Wonderstruck: Discovering the Wonders of the World

The Roman Colosseum was constructed in the first century by Emperor Vespasian. The amphitheatre is a marvel of engineering, measuring 620 by 513 feet (189 by 156 metres) and featuring a complex system of vaults.

- Advertisement -

Wonders of the World: A Swiss foundation initiated a campaign in 2000 to identify the New Seven Wonders of the World. Given that the original list of the Seven Wonders was compiled in the second century BCE and that only one of the original entries is still extant (the Pyramids of Giza), an update seemed warranted. More than 100 million votes were cast via the Internet or text messaging, indicating that individuals from around the globe concurred. The 2007 announcement of the final results was greeted with both applause and jeers

Wonders of the World

1. The Great Wall of China

Great might be an understatement. It is commonly believed that the Great Wall of China is approximately 5,500 miles (8,850 kilometres) long; however, a disputed Chinese study asserts the length is 13,170 miles (21,200 kilometres). The construction began in the seventh century BCE and lasted for two millennia.

- Advertisement -
The Great Wall of China 
The Great Wall of China

Although referred to as a “wall,” the structure consists of two parallel walls for considerable distances. In addition, the bulwark is dotted with watchtowers and barracks. However, the wall’s efficacy was not a particularly positive feature. Although the wall was constructed to deter invasions and raids, it failed to provide adequate security. Instead, academics have observed that it was primarily “political propaganda.”

2. Chichén Itzá

The Castillo, a pyramid in Toltec architecture, towers 79 feet (24 metres) above the plaza at Chichen Itza, Yucatán state, Mexico. Invaders constructed the pyramid after conquering the ancient Maya city in the tenth century.
El Castillo, a Toltec-style monument, Chichén Itzá, Yucatán state, Mexico.

Chichén Itzá
Chichén Itzá

As evidence of the Mayans’ astronomical prowess, the structure contains 365 steps, the number of days in a solar year. During the spring and fall equinoxes, the setting sun casts shadows on the pyramid that resemble a serpent writhing down the north stairway; at the base of the pyramid is a stone snake head. However, there was more to life than labour and science. The largest tlachtli (a form of sporting field) in the Americas is located at Chichén Itzá. On that field, the locals participated in a ritual ball game that was prevalent in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica.

3. Petra

The Al Khazneh Treasury structure in Petra is a historic Jordanian archaeological site. Rock-cut architecture.

The ancient city of Petra, Jordan, is situated in a remote valley surrounded by sandstone cliffs and mountains. It was said to be one of the locations where Moses struck a boulder and water began to flow. Later, the Nabataeans, an Arab tribe, made it their capital, and during this period it flourished and became a major spice trading hub. The Nabataeans, renowned carvers, carved dwellings, temples, and tombs into the sandstone, whose hue varied with the sun’s position.

Petra
Petra

In addition, they constructed a water system that enabled the cultivation of verdant gardens and agriculture. Petra reportedly had a population of 30,000 at its peak. Nonetheless, the metropolis began to decline as trade routes shifted. A major earthquake in 363 CE caused additional difficulties, and after a second earthquake in 551 CE, Petra was abandoned progressively. Although the city was rediscovered in 1912, it was largely neglected by archaeologists until the late 20th century, and there are still many questions about it.

4. Machu Picchu

Hiram Bingham “discovered” this Incan site near Cuzco, Peru, in 1911, believing it to be Vilcabamba, an Incan stronghold used during the 16th-century rebellion against the Spanish. Despite the fact that this claim was later disproven, academicians continue to be baffled by Machu Picchu’s purpose. Bingham believed that it was home to the “Virgins of the Sun,” women who took a vow of chastity and resided in convents.

Machu Picchu
Machu Picchu

Others believe it was likely a place of pilgrimage, while others believe it was a regal retreat. Apparently, it should not be the location of a beer commercial. In 2000, a crane used for a similar advertisement collapsed and fractured a monument.) Machu Picchu is one of the few major pre-Columbian ruins discovered virtually intact, according to what is known. It features agricultural terraces, plazas, residential areas, and temples despite its relative isolation high in the Andes Mountains.

5. Christ, Redemptor

Christ the Redeemer, a colossal statue of Jesus, towers atop Rio de Janeiro’s Mount Corcovado. Its origins date back to shortly after World War I when some Brazilians dreaded a “tide of godlessness.” They proposed a statue, which Heitor da Silva Costa, Carlos Oswald, and Paul Landowski ultimately designed.

Christ, Redemptor
Christ, Redemptor

Construction began in 1926 and lasted for five years. The resulting monument is 98 feet (30 metres) tall, excluding the height of its base, which is approximately 26 feet (8 metres), and its outstretched arms span 92 feet (28 metres). It is the world’s tallest Art Deco sculpture. Approximately six million tiles cover the reinforced concrete Christ the Redeemer. The statue has been frequently impacted by lightning, and during a storm in 2014, the tip of Jesus’ right thumb was damaged.

6. Colosseum

The Roman Colosseum was constructed in the first century by Emperor Vespasian. The amphitheatre is a marvel of engineering, measuring 620 by 513 feet (189 by 156 metres) and featuring a complex system of vaults. It could accommodate up to 50,000 spectators, who observed a variety of events. Possibly the most notable events were gladiator battles, though animal fights between humans were also prevalent.

Colosseum
Colosseum

In addition, water was occasionally poured into the Colosseum to simulate naval battles. It is debatable, however, that Christians were martyred there by being cast to lions. According to estimates, approximately 500,000 individuals perished in the Colosseum. In addition, so many animals were reportedly captured and slain there that certain species became extinct.

Anju Bobby George Biography: Age, Birthday, Early Life, Education, Awards, Family

7. Taj Mahal

This mausoleum complex in Agra, India, is perhaps the grandest example of Mughal architecture and is regarded as one of the world’s most iconic structures. It was constructed by Emperor Shah Jahn (1628–58) in memory of his wife Mumtz Maal (“Chosen One of the Palace”), who perished in 1631 while giving birth to their fourteenth child. The construction of the complex, which features a vast garden with a reflecting pool, took approximately 22 years and 20,000 employees.

Taj Mahal
Taj Mahal

The mausoleum is constructed of white marble with semiprecious stones arranged in geometric and ornamental patterns. Its central dome is encompassed by four lesser domes. According to some accounts, Shah Jahan desired a tomb constructed of black marble. However, he was deposed by one of his sons prior to the commencement of work.

Eric Joseph Gomes
Eric Joseph Gomeshttps://www.eduvast.com/
Seasoned professional blog writer with a passion for delivering high-quality content that informs, educates, and engages readers.

Popular Articles